99

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

poorer quality water. Both wells were

eventually shut down for good in 2007

when the agreement was reached to

purchase water from Wheatland

Electric.

A maintenance agreement had to be

secured as a condition of funding and

the city of Holcomb stepped up to the

plate and agreed to help with billing and

maintenance with Perry Smith as

operator and then City Clerk Robin

Lujan taking care of the district's billing.

Another  unfortunate incident the

district experienced was when the city

of Garden City fire department was

flushing hydrants and proceeded to

flush west of town unknowingly

opening hydrants on the rural water

district, thinking they were flushing city

hydrants. Apparently the RWD tank

that was purchased as part of the

original system had a few issues and

one of those deficiencies was too small

of a vent. With many hydrants open at

Jon Steele has been

employed by KRWA as a

Circuit Rider since 1995.

Jon is certified as a water

and wastewater operator.

He has more than twenty-

five years experience in

public works, construction

and industrial arts.

Kerri Ralston is the district's

office manager.

The district recently purchased a 6,000-sq. ft.

office at auction; this attractive sign is a welcome.

One of the issues I assisted Perry

with was cleaning the original

standpipe. Finney RWD 1 purchased an

existing well and drilled one additional

well. Both were Dakota wells with low

quality water; the water had high levels

of iron and manganese. I recall in 2000

the standpipe had  two feet of the most

nasty discolored, foul smelling sludge

in the bottom that I had ever seen.

I will never forget a conversation I

had with  groundwater geologist/-

hydrologist Robert Vincent, President

of Ground Water Associates in Wichita.

Robert assisted the district at the time

of the installation of the second well.

Robert reported that the district drilled

right down through 300 feet of the most

beautiful Ogallala water but couldn't

use a drop of it since no more permits

were being issued by the Division of

Water Resources in that formation. So

they had to use the deeper water from

the Dakota formation which was much

Perry Smith, (left), Manager of Water Works for Wheatland Electric Cooperative and

Superintendent for Finney County Rural Water District No. 1 and Francis Lobmeyer,

water technician at Wheatland, and operator at RWD 1, pause for a photo.

the same time, the roof of the standpipe

collapsed. That tank was removed at a

cost of $17,000 and a new standpipe

measuring 16 feet x 150 feet was

constructed; that tank has a capacity of

223,000 gallons.

New office

The district serves several businesses

and rural customers between Garden

City and Holcomb. The district also has

consolidated its operations into an

attractive 6,000 square-foot facility at

4532 West Jones, the main street

between Garden City and Holcomb.

The district recently hired Kerri Ralston

as its first full-time office manager. The

office building is actually more than the

district required  but it was purchased at

a very reduced price at auction. The

plan is for renting out the unneeded

space and also providing an area for

training. The building was originally

owned by Chesapeake Energy but was

sold due to reduced operations.

Perry Smith emphasized the key role

that Wheatland Electric played in

working with the RWD and the local

communities serving the needs of both

water and electricity. Wheatland is

committed to working with Finney

RWD 1 to help the businesses and

residents in the area survive and thrive.