35

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

M

ICROBIOLOGICAL

M

ONITORINGOF

A

CTIVATED

S

LUDGE

P

ROCESSES

Attendance: 131

This training session provided

information to operators and

consultants, lab personnel and

others how to optimize

wastewater treatment plant

processes using the microscope

and knowledge of wastewater microbiology. Attendees

learned how to identify the microorganisms that are

favorable to the activated sludge treatment process and how

to maintain the proper environment for their growth. The

discussions  included methods for controlling, identifying

and monitoring microorganisms in biological phosphorus

and nitrogen removal systems. Presentations also explained

how to diagnose treatment system problems based on the

microbiology of the system and the identification of and

how to control filamentous bacteria. Step-by-step laboratory

procedures for tracking, identifying and diagnosing

conditions in activated sludge processes were included. This

was an outstanding session presented by a nationally

recognized expert in the field of wastewater treatment. 

Presenter: 

Tony Glymph-Martin, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of

Greater Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

C

ITY

C

LERKS

' F

ORUM

– W

EATHERING

A

LL

S

TORMS

Attendance: 34

There were two separate

training sessions during this

forum. From 9:45 a.m. to

noon, the clerks learned about

basic water system operations.

This presentation included an overview of regulations

including monitoring, reporting, and plant operations. Many

city clerks have expressed concern that they do not

understand all the regulations that are required of public

water systems. Clerks were encouraged to develop and

maintain good communications with operators. The

afternoon session dealt with workplace issues including

transparency, workplace drama, leadership, etc. City clerks

deal with a host of issues, and citizens generally expect to

receive information from clerks on any number of topics.

Presenters: 

Delbert Zerr, Kansas Rural Water Association, Manhattan, Kansas

Marche Fleming-Randle, Ph.D, Wichita State University, Wichita,

Kansas

G

EOLOGY

, A

QUIFERSAND

W

ATER

W

ELLS

– 

E

NSURINGA

G

OOD

W

ATER

S

UPPLY

Attendance: 181

The majority of public water

systems in Kansas use

groundwater as a source. That is

especially true in the western half

of the state. This training

discussed the types and characteristics of subsurface

geological formations and aquifers. Aspects of well

operations such as yield, specific capacity, zone of

influence, static water levels, drawdown water levels and

record keeping were reviewed. Proper construction of water

wells was explained, including sites election, test drilling,

water quality, drilling of the bore hole, well casing, grouting

of the annular space, gravel packing, screen placement and

well development. The training also reviewed KDHE design

standards. Attendees also learned about how contaminants

such as nitrates, arsenic, iron and manganese can increase in

the well water causing problems with well operation.

Microbial and mineral blockages in wells were discussed as

was well efficiency. The training used real life situations to

describe how to clean wells, restore/ or improve water

quality, and disinfect wells. 

Presenters: 

Brad Vincent, P.G., Ground Water Associates, Wichita, Kansas

Ned Marks, P.G., Terrane Resources Company, Stafford, Kansas

Mike Schnieders, Water Systems Engineering, Ottawa, Kansas