36

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

More danish, fruit cups, muffins and more

awaited early arrivals for the opening session. 

B

OARD

/C

OUNCIL

L

EADERSHIP

– 

W

EATHERING

A

LL

S

TORMS

Attendance: 44

So, you've been elected to the board or council. Now

what? Those who attended this session learned about the

critical roles they have in the governance of their local water

or wastewater utilities, among other responsibilities. As

representatives of the public, it’s the board or council

members who bear the burden for good decision-making on

behalf of the public they represent. Financial difficulties,

personnel issues, construction or renovation complications,

or dispute resolutions can all become challenges that may

necessitate a different approach to leadership and decision-

making. Here are some of the situations that were presented

to the attendees: 1) How do you manage situations when the

discussion becomes polarized, whether in a board meeting

or in a public hearing? 2) How do you better handle

conflicts between customers and board/council members or

between board/council members and staff? 3) How do

boards and council energize public support for system

enhancements and renovations? Last, how does a board or

council member help establish a culture of accountability

the board or council? 

Presenters:

Patricia Clark, Kansas Leadership Center, Wichita, Kansas

Ronald Alexander, Kansas Leadership Center, Wichita, Kansas 

RWD O

FFICE

F

ORUM

Attendance: 48

The tasks that rural water district

office staff experience are quite

varied. Duties include billing and financial report, entering

data, maintain confidentiality, and often deal as an arbitrator

of disputes. Presentations covered in this round-table,

somewhat open discussion provided answers to questions on

topics including record retention, easements, the new rule

(HB 2020 or KSA 82a-621) forfeiture for non-payment,

preparing meeting agendas, etc. This session was intended

for those who work in RWD offices or those who serve on

boards to help them better understand the responsibilities of

the office staff. A second morning presentation discussed

insurance coverages and the specialized coverages as well

as risk management techniques. An overview on coverages

from property to workers compensation was of keen interest

to the attendees. The afternoon presentation addressed ways

to help create better interactions with customers. The focus

was on professionalism to help improve customer service. 

Presenters: 

Crystal Decker, TrustPoint Insurance, Burlington, Kansas

Leslee Rivarola, KU Public Management Center, 

Lawrence, Kansas

W

ORKING

T

OGETHER

T

O

G

ET

G

REAT

R

ATES

Attendance:  27

Is rate setting an art, science or just politics? How about

some of all? This presentation discussed water rates and the

rate setting process and how to fairly structure rates. Those

attending learned that setting rates fairly is something close

to being a team sport. First, KRWA can provide no cost

assistance and provide a basic review. When the review

requires much more focus due to complexity of the utility

operations, then the Kansas Rates Program comes to the

rescue. GettingGreatRates does a thorough rate analysis.

The presentations covered the rate setting field. Many of

those attending were adopting new rates. They left with a

better understanding of how all the facets of designing,

funding, planning, etc. 
Presenter: 

Carl Brown, GettingGreatRates.com, Jefferson City, Missouri

Mark your calendars!

KRWA’s 52nd Annual 

Conference & Exhibition