44

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

he question sounds simple

enough, but the answer is a

challenge.

What is the value of water in Kansas?

“The reality is that if I asked all of

you this question, you would say it’s

priceless,” said Tracy Streeter, director

of the Kansas Water Office. “It’s

intrinsic value is priceless. But until

you are looking at water scarcity, it’s

worth nothing.”

Streeter delivered a presentation

during the 2018 Kansas Rural Water

Association Annual Conference about

the State of Kansas’ attempts to better

understand how much worth is assigned

to our water.

“Even experts disagree on what

factors to take into account,” Streeter

said. It’s even more difficult in a state

like Kansas, where water quality and

quantity vary dramatically depending

on the location.

The Kansas River, for instance, flows

from Junction City to Kansas City, and

typically experiences good flows.

WaterOne, the water utility that serves

much of Johnson County, has intakes

on both the Kansas and Missouri Rivers

– “a seemingly endless supply,” Streeter

said.

On the western side of the state, in

Groundwater Management District 1,

people who have lived on farms are

finding that their water wells are

running dry. They’re relocating to

towns or making other accommodations

to find a steady water

supply, Streeter said.

“I bet those folks who are

moving their houses and

piping water place a higher

value on water than

someone living in Overland

Park today,” he said.

“Another question figures in

to the discussion,” Streeter

said. “What’s more important, water

quantity or water quality?”

“I say it’s quantity,” he said. “If you

don’t have it, it doesn’t matter what the

quality is. When you’re up against it,

you take whatever you can get, treat it

and use it.”

There are examples where dollar

amounts are applied to water – but

those are “what we pay for it, not what

it’s worth,” he said. Streeter provided

some examples, including:

v

The average Kansan spends $6.51

per 1,000 gallons of tap water. Of that

cost, $0.03 goes to the State Water Plan

Fund; the remainder toward treatment

and distribution.

v

In 2002, the city of Colby

purchased irrigation rights for 320 acre-

feet of water from one farm for $2,256

per acre-foot. In 2009, Dodge City

purchased water rights totaling 1,465

acre-feet from three farms for an

average price of $2,265 per acre-foot.

These prices illustrate the market price

of water, Streeter said.

v

There is a water bank in Kansas,

in Groundwater Management District 5

in central Kansas. Streeter described it

as a “kind of brokerage firm” for water

transactions. Each transaction also

carries with it a requirement for water

conservation. A buyer can sign a lease

for a certain amount of water for one

year at a time, Streeter said. The

average value of water traded in the

water bank is $78.04 per acre feet.

“This is really our only true value we

have for knowing how water is trading

on a daily basis,” he said.

v

The Kansas

Water Office

also is involved

in pricing the

water it sells

wholesale to

municipal and

industrial

customers from

reservoirs in which the

office owns water

storage. Some contracts from the 1970s

capped the rates at $0.10 per 1,000

gallons. New contracts in 2018 offer

variable rates to customers at $0.39 per

1,000 gallons. The water office is only

charging what it needs to cover their

own costs, Streeter said, but those older

fixed rates are presenting a challenge to

do just that.

v

The recently completed project to

dredge John Redmond Reservoir in

Coffey County to remove silt and

provide more storage space for water

cost about $20 million. Other reservoirs

are facing similar needs to find storage

space – and price tags in the tens of

millions of dollars to remedy those

issues, he said.

v

Streeter quoted a KRWA rate

survey that showed Kansas residential

water rates ranging from $1.40 to $17

per thousand gallons, an average of

$6.51 per thousand gallons. Rural water

district rates range from $1 to $22.90

per thousand gallons, an average of

$9.10 per thousand gallons.

“It will be increasingly important to

think about the value of water going

forward,” Streeter said, citing the

example of Cape Town, South Africa,

which imposed strict restrictions on its

water users when supplies nearly ran out

earlier this year – not to mention having

good data to inform conversations about

funding water projects.

“If we understand what the true value

is before we have to, aren’t we better

off? Can’t we be prepared for it?” he

asked.

Tracy Streeter, Director, Kansas Water

Office.

Valuing Water in Kansas: Supply, Quality, Demand

Complicate the Math when it Comes to Assigning a

Value to Water in the State

T