45

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

afety is a priority for cities and

water districts to prevent their

workers from being physically

injured.

That commitment should also be

extended to ensuring that workers are

also protected from mental and

emotional harm by not tolerating

harassment, said Wichita attorney Kelly

Rundell.

“This is a way you can help your

employees become better people, not

just better employees,” Rundell, said.

“It’s a way you can show you care

about your employees, and take

responsibility for the safety of your

employees.

“You probably do that all the time

with regards to making sure your

people have their jackets on, their

(safety) cones out, and all the right

equipment that they need. This is just

an extension of that, making sure

people are safe in the workplace.”

Rundell, with Hite, Fanning &

Honeyman, LL.P, is a former deputy

city attorney for the city of Wichita. She

conducted a session on workplace

harassment at the 2018 Kansas Rural

Water Association conference.

The recent “#metoo” movement has

brought new attention to the

responsibilities of employers to prevent

harassment, she said. 

While the national media stories have

covered well-known people in the

motion picture and television industries,

famous chefs, and high-ranking

officials, she said, workplace

harassment can happen anywhere.

But, she said, it can also be prevented

with common sense policies, and

creating a culture where it’s not

acceptable.

Rundell quoted the Equal

Employment Opportunity Commission,

which has defined workplace sexual

harassment as unwelcome sexual

advances and other verbal or physical

conduct of a sexual nature, when the

conduct explicitly or implicitly affects

an individual’s employment,

unreasonably interferes with an

individual’s work performance or

creates an intimidating, hostile, or

offensive work environment.

This can include jokes, images,

and stories about one’s sexual

encounters, she said – content that

could make another person

uncomfortable or even afraid.

“You could be discussing your sexual

fantasies and personal encounters with

a co-worker who wants to hear it,”

Rundell said, “but you need to realize

the person you’re telling it to may not

be the only person who hears it.”

Harassers can be male or female, she

said, but a main characteristic is that the

person lacks empathy. They also have a

tendency to be authoritative and

dominant, and use their power over

others – making sure their victim can’t

fight back.

While it’s typically believed that

harassment at a workplace is caused by

a co-worker, people can also experience

harassment from outsiders who come

into an office, such as vendors and even

customers.

When that happens – “You may have

to step in to protect your employees,”

she said.

Workers affected by harassment

experience higher rates of stress,

depression, reduced productivity, and

poor attendance, Rundell said, “none of

which you really want in your

workplace.”

“All these things lead to employee

turnover,” she said. “Then you have to

go out and find someone new to train

and get up to speed. Hopefully, the

harasser doesn’t run them off too.”

It’s also expensive for an employer to

deal with a lawsuit brought by someone

who has experienced harassment, she

said. If a court decides in favor of that

person, their workplace may have to

rehire them and pay their back wages,

or even pay future wages. The

employer may also be responsible for

compensation for emotional pain and

suffering and for attorney fees for the

person who filed the suit.

These fees and fines can easily slide

into millions of dollars, Rundell said.

“Maybe you don’t care about the

situation that’s going on,” she said, “but

if you think of the monetary costs, that

should be enough to take action and put

an end to that.”

An employer should develop a code

of conduct that specifically prohibits

harassing behavior. But they should

also develop policies that include:

u

Having multiple places to

complain. The chef Mario Batali’s

restaurant group had a policy of

reporting all unwanted activity to the

head chef – but it was the head chef

who was doing the harassing.

u

Keeping investigations as

confidential as possible. Even if other

co-workers must be interviewed, all

should agree to keep the details

confidential, particularly when the

situation is sensitive.

u

Investigating all complaints

immediately. “The longer it goes on, the

worse it’s going to get,” Rundell said.

u

Ensuring that a person filing a

complaint will not be subject to

retaliation.

“Employers can also require

mandatory training for employees – and

it can be as simple as ordering a

training DVD and requiring everyone to

watch it,” Rundell said.

“The Kansas Human Rights

Commission also offers online

training,” she said, at

http://www.khrc.net.

The commission

provides a certificate to those who

complete the training – which an

employer could require from all

employees.

#Metoo in the Workplace – A Summary of One

Conference Training Session    

S