hile the Kansas Rural Water

Association encourages water

and wastewater operators,

managers, administrators, and board and

council members to attend training

sessions and the annual conference, I

thought I would take this opportunity to

explain that KRWA staff also attend

training. Yes, the training is a

requirement of the contracts

administered by the National Rural

Water Association – but KRWA hopes

that those staff who attend see it as more

than being a requirement. KRWA cannot

send all its staff off to a NRWA-

sponsored training event for four days.

Other staff have been able to attend

specialized training such as on

chlorinator repair, meter testing, etc.,

and such opportunities are always

considered.

Like local communities, employee

development is a way that employers

can keep employees engaged at work to

prevent what otherwise might turn into

boredom. Interesting training programs,

and future events that are fun or

challenging to look forward to help

encourage workers to do as well as

possible. And I think that's the reason

that KRWA-sponsored training sessions

have such high attendance. People

attend training sessions because they

know and respect the organization

sponsoring the sessions and have

confidence in the presenters because

they have experience. 

I asked KRWA's six staff members to

report what they participated in or

learned at the recent in-service held in

Tulsa, Oklahoma. I thought that readers

might like to see the level of topics that

the KRWA staff participated in. 

Circuit Rider Jon Steelereported

attending a session concerning the

requirements to use American Iron and

Steel. This isn't a new provision as it's

been incorporated into some lending

programs for many years. However,

USDA Rural Development recently

implemented the requirement. Jon

reports also attending classes on

diagnosing wastewater lagoon

problems, how lagoon chemistry

changes throughout the day and

different times of the year and the

importance of record keeping and how

to monitor these changes for optimizing

performance. Electrical training

sessions that Jon attended discussed

how to properly read and interpret

motor nameplates along with electrical

W

6

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

By Elmer Ronnebaum, KRWA General Manager

safety and arc flash safety. VFD drives

were discussed as were proper

grounding, wire sizes and types, heat

dissipation and other operating

environment concerns. Other sessions

addressed VFDs and programming. 

Circuit Rider Rita Claryalso

attended the sessions on American Iron

& Steel and noted that these requirement

under USDA Rural Development are

very similar to the State Revolving Loan

programs funded through EPA. Because

Rita's work at KRWA involves working

with as many as three dozen

communities on funding application and

attending to the documentation required

for the applications, she noted that the

certification requirements by contractors

and the engineer mandate that the

certificate must accompany all payment

disbursements for project. Other aspects

of the training included the Electronic

Preliminary Engineering Report (ePER)

as the latest innovation to help

applicants. 

Rita also presented at the NRWA in-

service because she is noted nationally

as someone who is very proficient with

the use of RD Apply – USDA's online

funding application process. Rita gave

tips and easy ways to include additional

documents to help the loan applicant and

RD Specialists. Scott Barringer and

Christie McReynolds, formerly with

Kansas USDA and now with USDA,

Washington, DC, are part of team that

helped develop and now provide training

for RD Apply. Scott and Christie were

also present to assist with this session.

Interesting training

programs, and future

events that are fun or

challenging to look

forward to help

encourage workers to

do as well as

possible. 

KRWA Staff Gain

Proficiency at

NRWA In-Service

Training