7

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

After the session, Rita, Scott and

Christie registered approximately a

dozen in-service attendees from other

states in eAuthorization. Other sessions

Rita attended concerned NRWA's

“online log tracking” and a lesson to

improve photography skills. Another

session discussed use of drones in the

water and wastewater industry. Other

sessions Rita attended included

sustainable management strategies

presented by John Schwartz, USA

BlueBook. John gave some good

approaches on how to encourage people

to attend the training and how to involve

more board/council members. 

KRWA staff learned that USDA Rural

Development has: 

v

7,753 borrowers

v

16,1003 loans

v

$12,503,659,666 outstanding

principal

v

USDA maintains a delinquency

rate well below one half of one

percent (< 0.5%)

Circuit Rider Doug Guenther

reported that he attended a session on

ways to improve photography, a session

on electric motor template interpretation

and the need to have a code book to

fully utilize the information. Doug also

attended the sessions on variable

frequency drives and learned more about

the calculations of electrical savings.

And he enjoyed the class on use of

drones in water and wastewater systems.

Doug says he learned that all the

concern over disinfection byproducts

was because two rats contracted cancer

because of being fed mega doses of

TTHMs but that is some speculation that

kidney disease in men, especially in

third world countries, may be linked to

disinfection byproducts. 

Wastewater Tech Charlie

Schwindamannlearned that EPA will

be sending a survey to all publicly-

owned treatment works this fall. This

survey is to obtain nationwide data on

nutrient removal. The intent is not to set

limits for nutrient removal. They studied

many treatment plants around the U.S.

and about five in Kansas including Clay

Center and Colwich. In a class on

wastewater lagoons, Charlie learned a

few new ways to review if treatment is

working well. Charlie also sat in on the

utility finance certification training

where rate setting procedures were

discussed. 

KRWA Source Water Specialist Ken

Koppreported that the Source Water

Protection Specialists took a day trip to

the Tulsa Port of Catoosa, the largest

ice-free inland port in the United States.

This was in addition to those staff

members attending the variety of other

training session topics. A report on the

Tulsa Port of Catoosa is printed in this

issue of The Lifeline. The port and its

lock and dam system are located on the

Verdigris River, northwest of the city of

Tulsa. Headwaters for the Veridgris

River are in Kansas. Its confluence with

the Arkansas River is a short distance

downstream from the port, which allows

water transport from the Tulsa area,

along the McClellan-Kerr waterway, to

the Mississippi River and the Gulf of

Mexico. Due to the greater controls on

streamflows through upstream dams on

the Verdigris and Arkansas Rivers, the

Tulsa Port of Catoosa is often more

desirable for shipping than the Missouri

River.  

Source Water Specialist Doug

Helmkereports that he was reminded of

Oklahoma's Blue Thumb Program

(

http://www.bluethumbok.com

), which

the Oklahoma Conservation

Commission manages. The program

once encouraged Oklahoma residents to

understand and practice water

conservation, efficient irrigation, use of

rain barrels, etc. It appears to be how

Oklahoma tries to control non-point

source pollution. He also learned that

Minnesota has a program

(

https://www.mda.state.mn.us/awqcp

)

that allows farmers to have their

operations reviewed for compliance with

existing ag chemical use, etc. If the

entire operation meets certain

thresholds, the operation can be

"certified" and exempted from any new

regulations for a period of ten years. 

KRWA Tech Assistant Monica

Wurtz found the most valuable part of

the in-service was the day and a half

Train-the-Trainer session. The session

was lead by excellent trainers from

several other state rural water

associations. She learned different

training techniques to help make

presentations interesting and creative.

She also learned about some of the

challenges other trainers have faced and

ways to overcome them. We also

discussed ways to be more

accommodating to attendees with

disabilities. This session gave me some

new ideas for training topics and more

importantly, ways to help me improve as

a trainer. She also attended three

sessions lead by representatives from the

U.S. EPA concerned water

contamination emergencies, overview of

the Revised Total Coliform Rule, and a

new EPA Workforce Tool.

Addressing weaknesses

Most employees, whether at KRWA or

in a local community, have some

weaknesses in their workplace skills. I

know that I do. As such, the topics that

I'm interested in are not the same as

those Lonnie Boller or Tony Kimmi or

Laurie Strathman or Greg Duryea might

be interested in – or even need to be.

Regardless, training opportunities help

strengthen the skills that each employee

has. The goal is to have an overall

knowledgeable staff with employees

who can take over for one another as

needed, work on teams or work

independently without constant help and

supervision from others. Similarly, if

your water district or city have interest

in a particular training topic or have any

suggestion for training, please let

someone at KRWA know – and KRWA

will work to provide experienced

persons to provide that training. And

typically, that is without cost or any

requirement to be a member of the

Association.

Elmer Ronnebaum is

KRWA General Manager;

he has been employed by

KRWA since 1983. He

served seven years on the

KRWA board of directors

prior to that. He also

helped develop a large

RWD and served for fourteen years on a water

district board of directors.