regulations if already in place. Systems

should also include details regarding

any connections to neighboring water

systems or providing bottled water to

customers. If system pressure has

dropped below 20 pounds per square

inch (psi) the system must contact

KDHE to issue a “boil water” notice.

Section 8: Emergency Contacts

In this section, systems need to

include a list of the following categories

of contacts, including home telephone

and cell phone numbers:

City / RWD personnel

Emergency Services (911)

Federal and State Agencies 

Services & Contractors 

Media

Section 9: Annual Review

The EWSP needs to be reviewed

annually by the city council / RWD

board and their operator(s). Make sure

contacts and telephone numbers are

kept up-to-date. In this section, provide

a signature page for the board / council

members and operator(s) to sign

following the annual review.

Once the EWSP is finalized, it is

recommended to keep copies of the

plan in more than one place –treatment

plant, city shop, city hall, RWD office,

etc. Systems will also need to produce a

copy of the plan during a KDHE

sanitary survey.

In conclusion, the EWSP may seem

like just another plan that you have to

create and keep on file, but it is

important for your system to be

prepared for an emergency. Hopefully

your system will never have to use it. If

you would like assistance with creating

or updating your system’s EWSP, call

the KRWA office at 785-336-3760 or

email me directly at monica@krwa.net. 

93

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

Section 3: Disaster Organization

In this section, systems will need to

list important personnel that will be

involved in disaster response and list

suggested tasks for each position. For

example:

City Mayor or Rural Water

District (RWD) Chairman, In Charge

Overall

1.  Coordinate and direct efforts of

maintenance personnel in repair of

damage.

2.  Establish communications within

the governing body, local news media,

and general public.

3.  Establish command posts, medical

posts, shelters, etc. while working with

the County Emergency Preparedness

Personnel.

Operator

1.  Assess damages and establish

communication with the Chairman and

other officials.

2.  Notify KDHE District Office or

Bureau of Water and request assistance

as needed.

3.  Oversee any repairs or alterations

from the source of supply to treatment

and pumping to throughout the

distribution system.

4.  Request emergency equipment /

supplies if needed.

5.  Request work assistance if

needed.

6.  Contact Power Company as to

loss of power.

Section 4: Mutual Aid

Agreement

In this section, systems need to

provide details regarding outside

organizations that can be contacted to

secure additional resources, such as

equipment, parts, materials, or

personnel. Outside organizations to

consider include the following:

Kansas Mutual Aid Program for

Utilities (KSMAP) is a state-wide

mutual aid program for water,

wastewater, electric and natural gas

utilities. KSMAP maintains an

inventory of equipment and personnel

available to assist others in the event of

an emergency and provides an

organized structure for requesting and

responding with help. For more

information on becoming a member of

KSMAP: 

1)  visit 

ksmap.org

2)  Talk to county emergency

management

3) Talk to neighboring water systems

Section 5: Inventory of

Emergency Equipment Available

In this section, systems should create

a list of equipment which the city or

RWD has on-hand, including, for

example, spare pumps, generators,

chlorinators, etc. Systems may also

want to list other locally owned

equipment or supplies which can be

obtained on short notice. Systems can

also contact KRWA or KDHE for any

other equipment needed. Both will do

their best to help locate needed items as

soon as possible.

Section 6: Vulnerability of

System (Disaster Response)

Vulnerability assessments help a city

or RWD identify potential threats to

their water supply and identify

corrective actions that can reduce or

mitigate the risk of serious

consequences. In this section, systems

need to create a list of the most likely

and most critical emergency situations

that could occur with corrective actions

to be taken for each situation. For

example:

Drought (water shortage)

Accidental spills or contamination

Power outage or damage to

treatment plant or booster station

building(s)

Distribution system –damage to

transmission main or storage

tower(s)

Terrorist threat 

Radioactive fallout

Section 7: Water Rationing

In the event of an emergency

situation in which systems are unable to

provide a reliable supply of water, the

system will need to initiate water

rationing procedures. In this section,

systems may want to refer to a city

ordinance or RWD bylaws or rules and

Monica Wurtz began work

with KRWA in October

2013. She previously

worked at the Kansas

Department of Health and

Environment and also

worked at US EPA Region

7 for four years. Monica

is considered a national

expert on various drinking water regulations.