95

THE KANSAS LIFELINE

July 2018

Commercial fertilizers used in agriculture and horticulture

– rural and urban – are common causes of high nitrates in

groundwater.

After visiting Pretty Prairie and learning about the town’s

agricultural heritage Royte posed a question in the article:

why hasn’t the city penalized nearby farmers using the same

chemicals causing their water contamination?

It’s more complicated than that, said Ned Marks of Terrane

Resources, a Stafford-based consulting company.

Marks, a geologist, described Pretty Prairie as a unique

situation, one akin to “being dealt a bad hand of cards.”

The city had been in compliance with the EPA’s MCL for

nitrates, Marks said, when the MCL was 20 parts per million.

When the EPA lowered its MCL for nitrates to 10 parts per

million, he said, the city immediately fell out of compliance.

Marks has had success in other communities in Kansas

who have also been out of compliance for nitrate

contamination by drilling deeper wells farther into aquifers,

avoiding nitrates that have seeped through into the upper

portions of the groundwater underneath those communities.

Pretty Prairie, however, has some nitrates at the top of the

aquifer and excessive nitrates at the bottom of the aquifer.

“There’s just no explanation for it, unless it’s from old, old

fertilizer applications,” Marks said.

With poor quality water at all levels of the aquifer, he said,

it would take quite a bit of time to mitigate the

contamination, as the contaminated groundwater moved

away from the city’s well field. The groundwater moves at a

rate of about 18 inches per day in that part of the aquifer.

There are situations that require a full-size water treatment

plant, Marks said. But communities can often avoid such

measures.

Englewood, a city of about 80 people in Clark County, is a

lesson in those efforts, Marks said, from choosing an

appropriate site to taking steps to protect the wellheads and

the source water.

Several years ago, the city faced significant challenges in

both water quality and quantity. The amount they had been

pumping exceeded the amount allowed by their water right;

the water they distributed was found to be above the

allowable limit of arsenic.

City staff and consultants began looking for alternate

sources of better quality water. On a recent sunny day, Marks

and a crew from Nash Water Well Service worked in the

Englewood Cemetery just north of town on the most recent

phase of the project.

The site is on the very southeast toe of the Ogallala

Aquifer, Marks said – go another mile to the south, and it’s

gone. But, he said, unlike the alluvial aquifer from the

Cimarron River and the local Five Mile Creek, where the

city had been pumping its water, there isn’t a problem with

arsenic in the new location.

Also, there seems to be more water available than the old

site.

“If we can get 80 gallons per minute, that should be

sufficient,” said Olen Whisenhunt, the town’s mayor. “I

would like to have a 1,000 gallon per minute well, but that’s

hard to find out here.”

Whisenhunt is in his second term as mayor. “You don’t run

for election around here, you get drafted,” he said – and his

tenure has been full of challenges. In 2017, the Englewood

area was hit hard by the wildfires that consumed hundreds of

thousands of acres of land along the Kansas/Oklahoma

border.

They are making progress now on their water challenges

with the project at the cemetery, one that has drawn the

attention of the Division of Water Resources at the Kansas

Department of Agriculture, the Kansas Department of Health

and Environment, and the U.S. Environmental Protection

Agency.

On a sunny day in late May, the crew cleaned out an old

test well to help determine if it could become a supply well

for the city. They brought chlorinated water from a nearby

source to use in the drilling process.

“The last thing we want to do is use bacteria-laden water,”

Marks said, “or use arsenic-contaminated water when we’re

trying to fix an arsenic problem.”